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RSACP wishes to inform that it shall be discontinuing the dispatch of print copy of JOACP to it's Life members. The print copy of JOACP will be posted only to those life members who send us a written confirmation for continuation of print copy.
Kindly email your affirmation for print copies to dranjugrewal@gmail.com preferably by 30th June 2019.

 
 
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Exploring the unknown territories in the new normal world of COVID


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Gian Sagar Medical College and Hospital, Banur, Patiala, Punjab, India
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Gian Sagar Medical College and Hospital, Banur, Patiala, Punjab, India

Correspondence Address:
Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa,
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Gian Sagar Medical College and Hospital, Banur, Patiala, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/joacp.JOACP_350_20

It is now well known that the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV-2) originated in the Wuhan province of Hubei, China in 2019. Having spread across different countries of the world, this highly contagious disease has posed many challenges for the healthcare workers to work without endangering themselves and their patients' wellbeing. Several things are yet not clear about the virus and the presence or absence of the virus in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is currently a debated topic. This article reports the perioperative management of two coronavirus disease-19 positive cases, one of whom was a pregnant patient. Their CSF samples, which were collected during the administration of spinal anesthesia, tested to be negative for viral reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test. We wish to highlight from these cases, that during spinal anesthesia, CSF in mildly symptomatic COVID-19 cases probably does not pose a risk of transmission to the anesthesiologist. However, we suggest that due to the varied presentations of the virus, health care personnel, especially anesthesiologists have to be careful during the perioperative management of such cases.


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    -  Bajwa SJ
    -  Gupta R
    -  Wahi A
    -  Goraya SP
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