Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 71--77

Significantly reduced hypoxemic events in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: Predictors and practice effect


Basavana Gouda Goudra1, Preet Mohinder Singh2, Lakshmi C Penugonda3, Rebecca M Speck4, Ashish C Sinha5 
1 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
2 Department of Anesthesia, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
4 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care; Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
5 Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA

Correspondence Address:
Basavana Gouda Goudra
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, 3400 Spruce Street, 680 Dulles Building, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
USA

Background: Providing anesthesia for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy procedures in morbidly obese patients is a challenge for a variety of reasons. The negative impact of obesity on the respiratory system combined with a need to share the upper airway and necessity to preserve the spontaneous ventilation, together add to difficulties. Materials and Methods: This retrospective cohort study included patients with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg/m 2 that underwent out-patient GI endoscopy between September 2010 and February 2011. Patient data was analyzed for procedure, airway management technique as well as hypoxemic and cardiovascular events. Results: A total of 119 patients met the inclusion criteria. Our innovative airway management technique resulted in a lower rate of intraoperative hypoxemic events compared with any published data available. Frequency of desaturation episodes showed statistically significant relation to previous history of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). These desaturation episodes were found to be statistically independent of increasing BMI of patients. Conclusion: Pre-operative history of OSA irrespective of associated BMI values can be potentially used as a predictor of intra-procedural desaturation. With suitable modification of anesthesia technique, it is possible to reduce the incidence of adverse respiratory events in morbidly obese patients undergoing GI endoscopy procedures, thereby avoiding the need for endotracheal intubation.


How to cite this article:
Goudra BG, Singh PM, Penugonda LC, Speck RM, Sinha AC. Significantly reduced hypoxemic events in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: Predictors and practice effect.J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol 2014;30:71-77


How to cite this URL:
Goudra BG, Singh PM, Penugonda LC, Speck RM, Sinha AC. Significantly reduced hypoxemic events in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: Predictors and practice effect. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Mar 29 ];30:71-77
Available from: http://www.joacp.org/article.asp?issn=0970-9185;year=2014;volume=30;issue=1;spage=71;epage=77;aulast=Goudra;type=0