Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 94--99

Postoperative urinary retention: A controlled trial of fixed-dose spinal anesthesia using bupivacaine versus ropivacaine


Shahla Haleem1, Ahmad Ozair2, Abhishek Singh3, Muazzam Hasan1, Manazir Athar1 
1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, J.N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, UP, India
2 King George's Medical University, Lucknow, UP, India
3 Department of Anaesthesiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences Bhopal, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Shahla Haleem
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, J.N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh
India

Background and Aims: Following spinal anesthesia (SA), patient discharge is often delayed due to postoperative urinary retention (POUR), the incidence of which varies widely. The present study of bupivacaine versus ropivacaine in equianalgesic doses was taken to explore the correlation between time to void urine and time for complete functional recovery. Material and Methods: In this double-blinded study fifty adult patients were assigned to two groups (bupivacaine/ropivacaine) according to alternate case allocation for receiving SA for lower abdominal, perineal, and lower limb surgeries, lasting less than 2 h. Statistical analysis was conducted using an intention-to-treat approach, using Mann–Whitney test for nonparametric data. Primary outcome data could not be obtained for 14 out of the 50 patients due to perioperative bladder catheterization. No patients were lost to follow-up. Results: Both the bupivacaine and ropivacaine groups were comparable in terms of ability to void (8.0 ± 2.3 vs. 7.0 ± 1.2 h;P > 0.05), modified Bromage scale after 4 h of SA (1.8 ± 1.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.9 grade;P > 0.05), time to complete ambulation (6.7 ± 1.4 vs. 6.1 ± 1.0 h;P > 0.05), and time to negative Romberg test (6.1 ± 1.4 vs. 5.6 ± 0.9 h;P > 0.05), respectively. Strong positive correlations (r = 0.7–0.9) were found between time to void urine and time for complete ambulation. Conclusions: Time to void urine and recovery of motor functions were found comparable statistically when bupivacaine and ropivacaine were used in the doses of 12.5 and 18.75 mg, respectively, for SA. However, group ropivacaine required lesser time to void and no patient developed POUR. Time to void urine was more than the time for ambulation. This may indicate a need for “selective spinal anesthesia” or adjuvant combination technique to accelerate the resolution of a block for ambulatory surgery.


How to cite this article:
Haleem S, Ozair A, Singh A, Hasan M, Athar M. Postoperative urinary retention: A controlled trial of fixed-dose spinal anesthesia using bupivacaine versus ropivacaine.J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol 2020;36:94-99


How to cite this URL:
Haleem S, Ozair A, Singh A, Hasan M, Athar M. Postoperative urinary retention: A controlled trial of fixed-dose spinal anesthesia using bupivacaine versus ropivacaine. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jun 1 ];36:94-99
Available from: http://www.joacp.org/article.asp?issn=0970-9185;year=2020;volume=36;issue=1;spage=94;epage=99;aulast=Haleem;type=0