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CASE REPORT
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 114-116

Early presentation of postintubation tracheoesophageal fistula: Perioperative anesthetic management


1 Department of Anaesthesiology, LRS Institute of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, Mehrauli, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Anaesthesia, Medanta, Gurgaon, India

Correspondence Address:
Depinder Kaur
Department of Anaesthesiology, LRS Institute of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, Mehrauli, Delhi - 110 010
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9185.92460

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Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adults occurs as a result of trauma, malignancy, cuff-induced tracheal necrosis from prolonged mechanical ventilation, traumatic endotracheal intubation, foreign body ingestion, prolonged presence of rigid nasogastric tube, and surgical complication. Anesthetic management for repair of TEF is a challenge. Challenges include difficulties in oxygenation or ventilation resulting from placement of endotracheal tube in or above the fistula; large fistula defect causing loss of tidal volume with subsequent gastric dilatation, atelactasis, and maintenance of one lung ventilation. The most common cause of acquired nonmalignant TEF is postintubation fistula, which develops after prolonged intubation for ventilatory support. Acquired TEF, which occurs after prolonged intubation, usually develops after 12-200 days of mechanical ventilation, with a mean of 42 days. We present a rare case of TEF that developed after 7 days of intubation. It was a difficult case to be diagnosed as patient had a history of polytrauma, followed by emergency intubation and both these conditions can contribute to tracheobronchial injury.


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