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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 328-337

Principles of neuroanesthesia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage


1 Department of Anesthesia, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India

Correspondence Address:
Sandeep Kundra
1662-GRD Housing Complex, Sec-39, Chandigarh Road, Ludhiana, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9185.137261

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Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is associated with high mortality. Understanding of the underlying pathophysiology is important as early intervention can improve outcome. Increasing age, altered sensorium and poor Hunt and Hess grade are independent predictors of adverse outcome. Early operative interventions imposes an onus on anesthesiologists to provide brain relaxation. Coiling and clipping are the two treatment options with increasing trends toward coiling. Intraoperatively, tight control of blood pressure and adequate brain relaxation is desirable, so that accidental aneurysm rupture can be averted. Patients with poor grades tolerate higher blood pressures, but are prone to ischemia whereas patients with lower grades tolerate lower blood pressure, but are prone to aneurysm rupture if blood pressure increases. Patients with Hunt and Hess Grade I or II with uneventful intraoperative course are extubated in operation theater, whereas, higher grades are kept electively ventilated. Postoperative management includes attention toward fluid status and early management of vasospasm.


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