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Table of Contents
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 129-130

In reply to the article “A simple solution to fogging inside goggles used as a part of personal protective equipment”


1 Department of Opthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 College of Nursing, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
3 Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
4 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
5 Department of Orthopedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Date of Submission18-Nov-2020
Date of Acceptance29-Nov-2020
Date of Web Publication10-Apr-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Chitta Ranjan Mohanty
Department of Trauma and Emergency, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhubaneswar - 751 019, Odisha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/joacp.JOACP_627_20

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How to cite this article:
Sahu SK, Radhakrishnan RV, Mohanty CR, Behera BK, Patro BP. In reply to the article “A simple solution to fogging inside goggles used as a part of personal protective equipment”. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol 2021;37:129-30

How to cite this URL:
Sahu SK, Radhakrishnan RV, Mohanty CR, Behera BK, Patro BP. In reply to the article “A simple solution to fogging inside goggles used as a part of personal protective equipment”. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Jun 24];37:129-30. Available from: https://www.joacp.org/text.asp?2021/37/1/129/313451

Dear Editor,

We read the article by Anand et al.[1] with a lot of interest. The authors have addressed a pertinent issue while working with personal protective equipment (PPE) amidst preventing SARS CoV-2 infection to the eyes. The fogging of goggles often because of leaking of expired air into it despite adequately fitted N95 mask is one of the significant problems faced by the healthcare workers. The fogging hampers vision and hinders work efficiency, especially for those engaged in critical procedures like surgeons and anesthesiologists. The resolution to address this issue suggested by the authors was also novel. However, we would like to put forward a few concerns and suggestions that could be a healthier strategy to prevent fogging without incurring any side effects.

Although the antifogging solution chosen to apply over the inner surface of the goggles were of use to minimize fogging, the chemical constituents of the same (propylene glycol butyl ether, 2- (2-butoxyethoxy) ethanol, fluorocaliphatic oxyethylene, potassium hydroxide, and magnesium lauryl sulfate)[2] were known to produce inflammatory complications on the exposed eyes and skin. Propylene glycol (PG), a common component of water-based paints and cooling liquids, may cause contact allergy and produce ocular and throat symptoms, including escalation of dyspnoea symptoms as highlighted by earlier literatures.[3] Furthermore, the 2-(2-butoxy ethoxy) ethanol (DEGBE) is a liquid belonging to the group of glycol ethers. The substance is widely used as a co-solvent in paints, dyes, inks, detergents, and cleaners. DEGBE has the potential to penetrate the skin, causing systemic exposure and may also cause local skin effects, such as irritation and contact dermatitis.[4] There exists very sparse information on health effects from occupational exposure to PG and DEGBE, highlighted in scientific databases.[3],[4] Additionally, the use of these chemical coated goggles by the healthcare workers without immersion in water heightens the risk for potential inflammatory side effects in long term use.

The authors had used protective goggles for the application of antifogging marker.[1] In our practice, we found these goggles get fogging within few minutes. Instead, we are using the 3 M Virtua CCS Protective Eyewear 11872-0000-20, Anti Fog Lens Clear [Figure 1], a specially designed antifogging glass, and resists fogging 2–3 h. This antifogging eyewear can be used along with other measures safely to prevent fogging.[5] We suggest that sensitive persons having symptoms of using the antifogging marker to take ophthalmology and dermatology consultation.
Figure 1: Antifogging protective [email protected] 3M

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Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Anand RK, Ray BR, Baidya DK, Bhattacharjee S, Maitra S. A simple solution to fogging inside goggles used as a part of personal protective equipment. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol 2020;36:413-4.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Swimming Goggles Anti-Fog Restorer - DecathlonB2B, https://b2b.decathlon.in/p/8400299_swimming-goggles-anti-fog-restorer.html#/1-254-no_size. [Last accessed on 2020 Nov 09].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Wieslander G, Norbäck D, Lindgren T. Experimental exposure to propylene glycol mist in aviation emergency training: Acute ocular and respiratory effects. Occup Environ Med 2001;58:649-55.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Gijsbers JHJ, Tielemans E, Brouwer DH, van Hemmen JJ. Dermal exposure during filling, loading and brushing with products containing 2-(2-Butoxyethoxy) ethanol. Ann Occup Hyg 2004;48:219-27.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
How to Stop Your Glasses from Fogging Up While Wearing a Mask. Available from: https://www.readersdigest.ca/health/conditions/stop-glasses-fogging-up. [Last accessed on 2020 Nov 09].  Back to cited text no. 5
    


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